With easing lockdowns anxiety could be on the rise: Experts
Anxiety on rise after lockdown easesImage: The Bridge Chronicle

With easing lockdowns anxiety could be on the rise: Experts

As schools, colleges and workplaces reopen, anxiety could be on the rise

The realities of mental health were experienced by many during the lockdown. It came as a reality of check for people who previously did not believe in the concept of mental wellbeing. And thus the lockdown proved to be a positive thing in creating discourse around issues related to mental health. But as the lockdown eases and social institutions finally begin to open, experts believe that this could trigger anxiety in many people.

According to the experts, the reopening and the resulting readjustment could cause people with mental health issues to suffer.

"Lockdown has given people with mental health conditions like anxiety and PTSD (Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders) permission to stay at home, and knowing that at some point you'll have to go out again can actually trigger stress and anxiety," Tine Van Bortel, a senior research associate in public health at the University of Cambridge, told media.

Rosie Weatherley, an information content manager at mental health charity Mind, said: "Some of us might have found there were some unexpected plus points to lockdown, and therefore feel uneasy or anxious at the prospect of it being lifted. For example, we may be worried about 'normality' resuming, or not wanting to return to a faster pace with busier daily lives, and less downtime to ourselves."

It was "really important" for government and employers to provide empathy and support for those who need it "beyond lockdown lifting", the Xinhua news agency quoted her as saying.

While the world experiences a resurgence of Covid cases, the fear of catching the virus could also lead to anxiety. And as schools, colleges and workplaces begin to call everyone back, this anxiety could become hard to deal with.

Experts in Britain have warned "still not out of the woods" amid concerns over new variants and the risks of the public breaching restriction rules.

To bring life back to normal, countries such as Britain, China, Germany, Russia and the US have been racing against time to roll out coronavirus vaccines.

(Inputs from IANS)

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