Some lesser-known facts about India's Independence Day

While we have all heard stories and studied the Indian freedom struggle, here are some lesser-known facts about the day India celebrated its freedom.
Some lesser-known facts about India's Independence Day
The Bridge Chronicle

The Indian freedom struggle was a long one. Indian freedom fighters struggled for years to free the country from the clutches of the British. The country held protests, movements and boycotts to speak up against the British Raj. Finally, on August 15, 1947, India had its moment.

While we have all heard stories and studied the Indian freedom struggle, here are some lesser-known facts about the day India celebrated its freedom.

1. The British parliament had rested the decision with Lord Mountbatten, the last Viceroy of undivided India to transfer the administrative power to Indians on June 1948. But Mountbatten chose to prepone the date and selected August 15, 1947, to avoid bloodshed and riots further. It is also believed that Lord Mountbatten chose the date as it commemorated the second anniversary of Japan surrendering to the Allied forces. 

2. While the country was celebrating the joy of achieving the hard-won freedom, Mahatma Gandhi, could not attend the celebration in Delhi. Instead, Gandhi was fasting to end the Hindu-Muslim riots in Bengal, during the August of 1947.

3. The tri-colour flag is based on the original Swaraj Flag. Swaraj means self-governance and is usually associated with Gandhi's concept for Indian independence from foreign domination. The Swaraj flag followed a similar colour scheme with a spinning wheel in the centre.

4. The country did not have a national anthem at the time of its independence. We may all have memorised Jana Gana Mana, but the Rabindranath Tagore-penned song was written in 1911. It was officially adopted as the National Anthem on January 24, 1950.

5. Another interesting fact around the Indian Independence day is that Pakistan celebrates it's Independence Day just a day before, ie August 14. The reason behind this was Lord Mountbatten, the last Viceroy of undivided India, was required to be present for the Independence Day ceremonies of both the countries.

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